Brian Lovelace | Los Angeles Wedding Photographer | BedJet Photoshoot
Brian Lovelace.com is LA's Wedding Photographer. Brian commits himself to beautiful and memorable imagery, capturing the purest essence of your big day.
corporate, bed shoot, bed product photography, product photography, art direction, editing, photoshop, photography, studio product photography, large product photography,
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BedJet Photoshoot

BedJet Photoshoot

Here are a few shots from a recent photoshoot with BedJet. As you may know, I am the lead photographer and videographer at Hawke Media. This was an incredible opportunity to challenge myself and learn a lot about creative corporate photography with larger products.

We shot the setup on an 18’x18′ cyclorama backdrop at Apex Studios in DTLA. My process involved using four Profoto strobes; one large 24″x36″ source as a key light, one strip box source as a hair light, another strip box source as a highlight for the BedJet product, and another bare bulb strobe to the white ceiling for even spread (fill) over the bed and model. The easiest way I found to ensure even spread while still keeping the products and model from becoming over and under exposed was by using my trusty light meter. I use the Sekonic L-758C, as an incident meter to judge the light all over the bed. My meter read a solid f8 aperture over the entire bed, which means I was getting close to what I wanted. After some tweaking, I managed to figure out that the missing component was the strip box ensuring that the BedJet was being highlighted well. I moved the strip box in closer and bam, we were good to go.

For post production, quite a bit of work was done to ensure that the products were depicted as modern and trendy. I used the healing brush tool on the backdrop’s floor, then desaturated the parts of the image that don’t have colorful components to -70. This helped bring out an even more minimal and clean feel. Some compositing was necessary to fix art-direction mistakes on set, such as the pillows not being centered or creases in the materials. After this, I decided to do a complete backdrop replacement. I selected the bed, bedside table and accents, and put them on a separate layer. On a layer below I added a gradient to help further emphasize the clean and minimal feel.